Appropriation in pop art

Pop art is too large a category to cover adequately here, but it’s fair to say that pop art embraces – or at least seizes on – the products of pop (mass) culture and turns them into art. Appropriation is consequently the order of the day with much pop art. If we look at proto-pop Read More …

Dadaist photomontage

Dadaism was a radical politicized artist movement in the early 20th century. 1910-1920 was a time of immense upheaval in the Western world, especially Europe: new technologies such as the telephone, radio, sound recording, and film came of age; World War I was a giant bloodbath (also partly because of new technologies: the machine gun, Read More …

From hip hop to identity appropriation

Disco, hip hop, sampling By the second half of the century, recording is the major focus of popular music as an industry. Recordings and technology become important areas for appropriation. Because records are mass-produced, more permanent than live performance, and major sources of wealth that are subject to copyright, legal and ethical questions about appropriation Read More …

Appropriation in 20th century avant-garde art

On the whole, avant-garde appropriation is not about repurposing or exploiting the great works of past masters in one’s own work, but rather about responding to, incorporating, and mastering through artistic creation the works produced by mainstream mass culture that are competing for people’s attention. [Download images of dadaist and surrealist collage and photomontage, readymades, pop Read More …

Remix before Remix

Before the age of mechanical reproduction – especially photography, sound recording, and video recording – it was difficult or impossible to use exactly someone else’s creation in your art. You could copy their painting or sculpture or tune, but you couldn’t literally lift their creation and drop it into your own. Literature – which did Read More …