identity appropriation

Identity appropriation is the appropriation of a (famous) human being’s image and personality after they are dead for uses they have not agreed to. Well known examples involve the use of dead celebrities “reanimated” through digital technology and used to sell products in tv ads or as figures in fictional films. Some ways in which Read More …

Fan movies vs fan edits vs fan vids

The three most common forms of fan-created video can be distinguished as fan movies, fan edits, and fan vids. Fan movies are videos in which fans recreate scenes from movies they are fans of, whether in live action, animation, or stop-motion animation with franchise toys. Fan edits (or fanedits) are versions of films that have Read More …

meme

I’m tentatively including memes under the modes and genres of creative appropriation because I adopt Limor Shifman’s definition of a meme in her very lucid and penetrating book, Memes in Digital Culture (2013). Shifman proposes that we use the term viral for ” a single cultural unit (such as a video, photo, or joke) that propagates in Read More …

postmodern decontextualization

This is my shorthand way of talking about a phenomenon that has become more prominent with the advent of performance abduction in the late 20th and early 21st century, though it has always been part of culture. There are two ways in which appropriated work may be decontextualized: (1) the appropriaters may be ignorant of Read More …

The British Invasion

In the 1960s, English rock musicians like the Rolling Stones, Eric Clapton, Led Zeppelin and many others were discovered by American listeners – largely because of the Beatles – and became a smash hit with American teenagers. Many of these UK groups had been listening closely to African American roots blues and electric blues – Read More …

Appropriation in pop art

Pop art is too large a category to cover adequately here, but it’s fair to say that pop art embraces – or at least seizes on – the products of pop (mass) culture and turns them into art. Appropriation is consequently the order of the day with much pop art. If we look at proto-pop Read More …

Appropriation art

All remix culture is technically “appropriation art,” especially techniques that essentially take things and use them virtually unchanged, like Duchamp’s readymades. However, in the 1980s the term was used by and about a few influential artists who took material by other creators and exhibited it with little change as their own work. The general intention Read More …

photomontage

The process and the result of making a composite photograph by cutting, gluing, rearranging and overlapping two or more photographs into a new image. (Wikipedia) The process was occasionally used in advertising in the late 19th century and for novelty postcards that were popular with the Victorians (many of which were proto-surrealist). People often had Read More …

Dadaist photomontage

Dadaism was a radical politicized artist movement in the early 20th century. 1910-1920 was a time of immense upheaval in the Western world, especially Europe: new technologies such as the telephone, radio, sound recording, and film came of age; World War I was a giant bloodbath (also partly because of new technologies: the machine gun, Read More …